2013 Fall Event Schedule

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All readings will be on electronic reserves, listed under UNIT 2013, Goodlad.

Friday, September 6

Marxism & the Interpretation of Culture at 25: Theories for the New Millennium II (Symposium)
Levis Faculty Center, Second Floor

A Symposium featuring papers by Bruce Robbins (Columbia), Jodi Dean (Hobart and William Smith), Andrew Sartori (NYU), Phillip Wegner (Florida), Cameron McCarthy (Illinois), and Rosalind Morris (Columbia).

Lead Organizers: Lauren M.E. Goodlad (Unit/English), Michael Rothberg (English/Holocaust, Genocide, & Memory Studies Initiative)

Co-sponsored by the Center for Advanced Study; the Department of English.

Event Schedule

Readings and Seminar Schedule

Thursday & Friday, September 19-20

Textures of Technology: Film Production and Aesthetics
Levis Faculty Center

A Symposium featuring a keynote lecture by Tom Gunning (Chicago), and papers by Rosalind Galt (King's College, London), Jennifer Barker (Georgia State), James Lastra (Chicago), Scott MacKenzie (Queen's University, Canada), Lisa Bloom (UCLA), Margaret Flinn (Ohio State), and James Hodge (Northwestern).

Lead Organizers: Lilya Kaganovsky (Slavic/Comparative & World Literature/Media & Cinema Studies), Anna Stenport (Germanic Languages & Literatures/Media & Cinema Studies), and Julie Turnock (Media & Cinema Studies) in collaboration with the Unit for Criticism & Interpretive Theory.

Event Schedule

Co-sponsored by the European Union Center through US Department of Education Title VI and European Union Center of Excellence grants; the Unit for Criticism & Interpretive Theory; School of Literatures, Cultures, and Linguistics; Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities; Russian, East European, and Eurasian Center; Department of Germanic Languages & Literatures; Social Dimensions of Environmental Policy (SDEP), Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures; Media & Cinema Studies; Center for Advanced Study; Department of English; Department of Spanish, Italian & Portuguese; Program in Comparative & World Literature; Department of French/French@Illinois.


Monday, October 7
IPRH Lower Level Seminar Room
8pm

Graduate Student Pizza Event

Learn about opportunities for scholarship and research support offered through the Unit for Criticism while eating pizza with the Unit's staff.

Please RSVP by emailing Esti Ezkerra or John Moore.

Monday, October 28
Levis Faculty Center, Second Floor
8pm

Author's Roundtable: The Visible Text: Textual Production and Reproduction from Beowulf to Maus

Thomas Bredehoft (Independent Scholar)

Respondents: Bonnie Mak (Library & Information Science/Medieval Studies), Shawn Patrick Gilmore (English), Allyson Purpura (Krannert Art Museum)

*Readings:

Bredehoft, Thomas. "Introduction." The Visible Text: Textual Production and Reproduction from Beowulf to Maus. Oxford UP, forthcoming in 2014.

---. "Chap. 4: Comics Textual Production." The Visible Text: Textual Production and Reproduction from Beowulf to Maus. Oxford UP, forthcoming in 2014.

*These readings are password protected. Please, e-mail Lauren Goodlad, Esti Ezkerra or John Moore for the password.

Co-organized with the Program in Medieval Studies.

Wednesday, October 30
Jewish Studies seminar room, EB 109
12:00-1:30pm

"After-Affects: Contemporary Literature and the End of the Novel"

A seminar with Pieter Vermeulen (Stockholm University)

Lunch provided; advance registration required. Please contact Michael Rothberg (English/Initiative in Holocaust, Genocide & Memory Studies) for more information.


Co-organized with the Initiative in Holocaust, Genocide & Memory Studies with co-sponsorship support from the Department of English and the INSPIRE Program.

Monday, November 4 Nicholson Distinguished Visiting Scholar Event

Levis Faculty Center, Third Floor
8pm

"Climate Change and the Human Condition"

Dipesh Chakrabarty (Chicago)

Introduction: Ashwini Chhatre (Geography and Geographic Information Science/Political Science)

This lecture will focus on some areas of cognitive dissonance that arise when we seek to bring together our concerns about global warming and our unavoidable investment in the idea of development as freedom.

Organized in collaboration with Social Dimensions of Environmental Policy.

Tuesday, November 5 Nicholson Distinguished Visiting Scholar Event

Seminar with Dipesh Chakrabarty

Lincoln Hall 1024, 9:00-10:30am

To register for the seminar please email unitRAesti@gmail.com.

Reading:

Chakrabarty, Dipesh. "The Climate of History: Four Theses." Critical Inquiry 35 (2009): 197-222.

Download this article from the library's website or write to lgoodlad@illinois.edu for a hard copy.

Organized in collaboration with Social Dimensions of Environmental Policy.

Tuesday, November 19
Lincoln Hall 1024
12:30-1:50pm

"Critical Care: The Relational Ethics of Reading"

Seminar with Talia Schaffer (CUNY) (pre-registration required)

In this article, I suggest that a disability theory, "ethics of care" (also called "relational ethics") might provide a useful alternative to the symptomatic/surface reading debate. Relational ethics is a feminist philosophy that argues that we are not the monadic subjects of classic Lockean thought, but instead we are all deeply enmeshed in interdependent relations in which we extend care to others while also receiving care. I start by briefly outlining the theory and showing how it operates in Victorian fiction, which is full of case studies of care communities, particularly Jane Eyre, The Portrait of a Lady, and The Clever Woman of the Family. I then ask whether mutual care can be extended into a theory of reading. What happens, I ask, if we conceptualize the text as a body - a vulnerable body that requires our care? How might we reconceptualize our own critical work if we see ourselves not as dissecting or unpacking, but rather, as offering care? Using relational ethics can offer new guidelines for our professional practices. For instance, it makes our teaching central to our work, not a distraction from it, and it suggests that we might regard footnoting and referencing others as a crucial act of communal formation in the virtual space of scholarship. The theory also offers critiques of our profession. The academic star system and adjuncting alike violate the egalitarian communitarianism this theory proposes, while perfunctory readings and tendentious criticism can be read as failures caused by our insufficient attention to the text as cared-for. Although relational ethics suffers from serious problems - which I outline in this article - it also suggests a new and promising way of conceptualizing ourselves, not as heroically invasive readers or as determinedly surface-level scanners, but rather, as participants in communal relationships that include our students, our fellow critics, and the texts themselves.

Coffee and cookies will be served. Feel free to "brown bag" your lunch.

To register for the seminar please email unitrajohn@gmail.com.

*Readings:

Schaffer, Talia. "Critical Care: The Relational Ethics of Reading."

*These readings are password protected. Please, e-mail Lauren Goodlad, Esti Ezkerra or John Moore for the password.

Organized in collaboration with the British Modernities Group.

Monday, December 9
Levis Faculty Center, Second Floor
8pm

"Experiments with Truth: The Hindi Colonial Historical Film"

Corey Creekmur (Iowa)

Introduction: Rini Bhattacharya Mehta (Comparative & World Literature/Religion/South Asian Studies/Middle Eastern Studies)

Organized in collaboration with a series of screenings, "Past, Present, and Future: Indian Cinema at One Hundred."